What is the best cast on for knitting?

The long-tail cast-on method is probably the most popular among experienced knitters. It does take a bit of practice to get this method down, but once you understand what you’re doing it’s quick and easy to get stitches on the needle. Uses: The long-tail cast-on also counts as a row of knitting, which is nice.

Does it matter how you cast-on in knitting?

This cast on gives you quite an elastic edge with a slight ridge. Where it’s particularly useful is when you have to cast on stitches in the beginning of a row, part way through a project – all you have to do is knit into the first stitch on the row and then continue to cast on the required number of stitches.

What cast-on should I use?

Which cast on should I use? Three popular cast on methods to start most types of garment.

  • The many ways to cast on.
  • Thumb cast on (often called backward loop). As a teacher of knitting this is often the one that people find the easiest to grasp and therefore is often taught to children.
  • Cable cast on.
  • Long Tail Cast On.
IT IS INTERESTING:  What size crimp cover to use for 2mm crimp bead?

Is long tail cast-on better?

The long tail cast-on is one of the most common cast-on methods. This is because it’s extremely versatile. While it helps create an even edge (something that can sometimes be difficult to create with the single cast-on method), it’s also a great cast-on to use on projects in which you may want a fairly elastic edging.

Why use a long tail cast-on?

The long tail cast on serves to cast on stitches onto the needles and it results in a very flexible rim. It works well in projects where you knit in stockinette stitch or rib stitch at the beginning. In addition, it results in a rim that is both consistent and beautiful.

Do you cast on the first row of knitting?

When counting rows, you do count the loops on the needle, but let’s start by talking about the cast on. If you are talking about following a pattern, then row 1 is always your first row of knitting, since the designer has no idea what type of cast on you will use.

Which cast-on method is best?

The long-tail cast-on method is probably the most popular among experienced knitters. It does take a bit of practice to get this method down, but once you understand what you’re doing it’s quick and easy to get stitches on the needle. Uses: The long-tail cast-on also counts as a row of knitting, which is nice.

Is long tail cast-on good for hats?

The long tail tubular cast is ideal for projects that need a stretchy trim, such as socks and hats. … It works very well in situations where you need a firm edge, but it is useless when used on something that needs a stretchy ribbing, such as socks or a hat. The edge is too firm to stretch adequately.

IT IS INTERESTING:  Question: Is chimerism the same as mosaicism?

Why is my cast-on row so loose?

This happens when your cast on stitches are too loose. … You may be using two needles or a larger needle to prevent your cast on from being too tight. Try using a smaller needle, until your cast on pleases you.

How do you knit first row after long tail cast on?

If you knit the first row after a long-tail cast-on, you’ll get a series of purl bumps on the right side (the knit side). Instead of knitting the first row, simply purl the first row (a wrong side row), and continue with stockinette stitch.

Does long tail cast on count as a row?

For example, the most popular cast on, the long tail method, creates both a cast on and a knitted row. So in this case, you would count that as the first row. If you do an easy loop cast on (recommended for beginners), it’s simply a cast on and not counted as a row.

What is the best cast on for ribbing?

The alternating cable cast on is also quite stretchy, making it nicely suited for ribbing. In fact, I sometimes refer to it as my “ribbing cast on”! While this cast on is more advanced than a long tail cast on, it’s a great technique to use for hats, mittens, socks and sweater sleeves.

How long should your long tail cast on be?

If you need 20 stitches of 4mm diameter stitches, then you’ll need a minimum of 20 x 1.26cm length. Convert to inches (1” per 2.54cm) and you’ve got roughly 10” minimum for the tail to cast on. Add a few more inches so that you’ll have yarn to hold on to at the end; four to five inches should do it.

IT IS INTERESTING:  Frequent question: What is the average cost of stitch fix?
My handmade joys